Monthly : June 2013

in News

The Story of Dreu – Episode 2 (Respect)

(click the cartoon to view a full sized version)

Discussion24 Comments

  1. alan_steacy says:

    White belt attained…moving on, feeling the power!

  2. speekpeep8 says:

    Blue hair guy already looks miffed that Dreu is not being derailed by his antics. I sense the tears of a clown will be falling in the near future.

  3. StephenGuillen says:

    Sounds like some diligence and discipline might be involved.  :) “We are what we do repeatedly. Excellence, therefore, is not an act, but a habit.” Aristotle

  4. bernardtgrace says:

    Hmmn love these little series very entertaining and informative

  5. dwillie says:

    I always seem to have much more on my Daily Targets than I can do in a day.  I’ve seldom completed every task on my list…sometimes because I have unanticipated requirements on my time (usually important issues that cannot be tuned out).  Should I always try to narrow my list to the things I can accomplish in the time I have available each day?  Or, as I have done in the past, include everything that is of the most importance to me that day?

    • Mark Joyner says:

      @dwillie Superb question.  The answer depends on how that’s working out for you.  If you’re OK with having some things left incomplete, and still do Start My Day every day, then keep it up.  As a rule, though, I’ve found that most folks do better with shorter lists.  It just feels better and this paradoxically boosts your productivity over time.

      • dwillie says:

        @Mark Joyner Actually, I think I’m better off completing my list every day possible.  But sometimes estimating the time required is tough to do.  And if my list is too long, sometimes I don’t start my day for another day or two…and I see that as not the best approach.
        So I need a doable list every day…not a list of just my top priorities.
        Thanks for your insight.

        • Mark Joyner says:

          @dwillie You might want to try planning on doing two rounds of SMD.  You can do a longer full one to start in the morning, make the list intentionally super light (perhaps of things you’re best at first thing in the morning).  And then do a 2nd, shorter round – with all modules turned off.  Splitting items up like this can allow you to optimize performance in other ways as well (some people are more creative in the morning – others in the afternoon – for example).

        • kherrmann says:

          @Mark Joyner  @dwillie Thanks for sharing and for your insights.  I truly LOVE this software, Mark – helps me keep my ducks in a row (most of the time).   :)

        • DougLanders says:

          @Mark Joyner  @dwillie Thank you both, for your questions and answers! I am in the same predicament as you, sir. I am going to try splitting it up into different lists and see if that helps me out. Sometimes when my Daily Targets list is so cumbersome it puts me in the mentality of “I’m not going to finish it anyway” and I get lethargic with finishing them.

  6. AggieAgsB says:

    @Mark Joyner I like the concept of Simpleology and have been using it now for over a month. However, I find the idea that watching a video explaining one very simple procedure over and over constitutes ‘training’ a bit absurd. I understand that repetition is important to create lasting habits, but let’s be honest with ourselves: the important habits involve actually *doing* Start My Day, using the Dreamcatcher, etc., and then completing your Daily Targets, NOT listening to the instructions to do so everyday. This is especially true given how simple the procedure is: I don’t see how anyone would need more than one, maybe two, passes at the instructions before ‘mastering’ the procedure. The thing that irks me the most is the condescending tone of the instructions in the yellow belt training: “See how easy it’s becoming?” (As if doing these things was ever hard in the first place.) “Now you can do Start My Day — this time, with the training wheels off!” (As if anyone really needed that video to tell them which buttons to click next.)
    The system is simple and intuitive; I applaud you for creating such a nice tool. But I feel like I’m being treated like an imbecile when doing my ‘training’.

    • Mark Joyner says:

      @AggieAgsB Yeah, it’s impossible to please everyone with the training.   We’ve made adjustments to White Belt so it’s not so repetitive – there now being short and long versions.  Plus you can fast-forward through the videos after the first 3 days.  So, if one simply wants to get the repetition without the instruction, they can do that.  We also plan to re-do the White Belt completely so that each day is different.  All of the belts we’ve created from Orange on have unique videos each day, rather than a repetition of the same lesson.

      • AggieAgsB says:

        @Mark Joyner OK, great. I must say that I’ve stuck to doing the training in spite of my comment above because it’s nice to have someone tell you what to do and get you going at the start of each day — it truly is a way to get excited about the things you want to get done! I look forward to the variation in the Orange Belt training!

      • LesGordon says:

        @Mark Joyner  @AggieAgsB Hey Mark I’d like to add my 2 cents worth here on this. I believe you’re absolutely correct to make the White Belt training repetitious. As a Coach, one of the major challenges I see with clients is a ‘habit’  I call future-racing – people in such a hurry to get to a destination and not mastering the basic habits. This behaviour creates a strong tendency  for people to give up too early and chase the next shiny object.
        I’m sure Bruce Lee didn’t just practice a punch a couple of times and then move on to a new technique. As he said, “I fear not the man who has practiced 10000 kicks once, but I fear the man who has practiced one kick 10000 times.” 
        Please don’t accede to people looking for an easy route – it’s detrimental to themselves in the process. 
        If people persist through the White Belt then they are highly likely to continue their productivity growth and most likely with you. If they give up, they were not likely to remain at any rate.
        Keep up the great work Mark. You and your team ar Simpleology are making a difference.
        Les Gordon

        • Mark Joyner says:

          @LesGordon  @AggieAgsB Hey Les, thanks for the really kind words.  I agree about the repetition, of course.  At the same time, I do wonder if we can engage the mind more effectively while at the same time ensuring all of the repetition gets done.

      • StephenGuillen says:

        @Mark Joyner  @AggieAgsB I have to practice my scales regularly over and over again.  A lot of people hate repetition, but I made a living with it for 12 years and sometimes I hated it too.  But it works!

    • Mark Joyner says:

      @AggieAgsB Also, once the training has been produced all the way up to Black Belt, we’ll probably go back and revise everything based on what we learn from the first folks who have gone through it.

  7. tonylotven says:

    Amber belt completed this morning. Streak at 64.  Going strong.  
    A word about repetition.   It is one of the least appreciated and most life changing choices we can make.  There are deep muscle and mind memories developed, even if you think its “simple” or have some other judgement about it.   Everyone has habits that lead us to do what we spend our time on every day.  Its said that most people do the same things in the same way everyday.  That they go to the same restaurants, visit the same places, etc. etc.  Its another real live application of the Pareto principle (80/20).
    If you skip ahead or think about your reaction to the training video repetition, then you are not doing the training. Your mind is focused on your objections or reactions.  It has been shown over and over again that mastery is achieved after spending 10,000 hours actually DOING the activity.  If you are annoyed or dissatisfied with the presentation, then you are not focused on just doing it and trusting it is having a deeper impact that you realize.  
    Will Mark and his crew keep working to improve it?  I have absolute trust that they will. But that is a separate discussion from the impact of going through the routine day in and day out, and keeping your streak going.  Trust that it is having an impact, and observe your thoughts to keep them clear and focused.  
    That’s my take on it this morning.  Thank you.

  8. StephenGuillen says:

    I just finished day 10 of my streak and am loving it!  I’m using Kaizen – restricting allotted time and getting an amazing amount done.

  9. AndrewMason says:

    Wax on, Wax off !!

  10. Branimir says:

    Third of the way through my Blue Belt training. Streak at 80. Enjoying it immensely.
     @tonylotven  Your comments about repitition are spot on. Looking forward to even more fantastic things to come in Simpleology. Thanks to Mark and his Team.

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